Jan 212011
 

On Monday of last week, Eric Daniels gave a stellar webcast on free speech. Here’s what one person said about the webcast, even though unable to attend the live event:

I just now got the chance to listen to Dr. Daniels’ webcast on the free speech. I also wanted to tell you that I loved it! Ever since the Clemson Conference I’ve always enjoyed hearing Dr. Daniels speak and this was definitely no exception.

I think putting talks together in this format is an incredibly awesome idea. I generally only hear these kinds of speakers in the one or two guests we have at Michigan every year, and of course at OCON. To have this kind of original content delivered straight to my computer was incredible.

Also, I thought content of the talk really hit the sweet spot in terms of working from a foundation that I was familiar with, bringing in a good number of things I didn’t know, and then weaving them together to demonstrate a more full understanding of the principles involved. I felt like I learned a lot, but never once felt like I was lost or couldn’t follow what he said.

I second that!

So… I’m pleased to announce that the webcast — in the form of 1 hour and 44 minutes of streaming video, streaming audio, or downloadable audio — is now available for sale. It costs $50 to purchase. For that price, you’ll enjoy full access to the streaming video and audio for at least two months. You can also download an audio MP3 of the webcast during that time, and you’re welcome to play that from now until doomsday. You’re welcome to share that streaming video or audio file with members of your own household, but not with anyone one else. You cannot download the video, but only the audio.

To purchase the webcast, you simply need to send me $50, preferably via PayPal. If you do that, I’ll send you the instructions for viewing the webcast within 24 hours.

Or, if you would prefer to pay by check or money order, please submit this order form, then mail your payment of $50 for each webcast ordered to Diana Hsieh; P.O. Box 851; Sedalia, CO 80135. In that case, you can expect an e-mail with instructions for viewing the webcast in a week or two, once payment has been received.

Further instructions on giving the webcast as a gift to someone else or showing it before a group can be found on the OList page for the webcast: Eric Daniels Webcast on the Foundations of Free Speech.

To refresh your memory, here’s the abstract, now slightly updated:

Freedom of speech and expression forms a vital foundation of a free society. The Founding Fathers established a firm but not unassailable foundation for protecting this freedom in the First Amendment. Over the course of the twentieth century, freedom of speech experienced a patchwork of protection and rejection by the courts. In recent major cases, the US Supreme Court and lower courts have appeared to bolster the protection for speech in areas such as campaign finance, obscenity, and commercial speech. Despite these victories, the foundation of these decisions has relied upon the flawed theories of free speech that have been part of American jurisprudence. Without a proper foundation for freedom of speech, these cases will remain a paper barrier to further assaults on our freedoms.

In this webcast, Dr. Daniels investigated some interesting recent developments in First Amendment cases (including Citizens United v. FEC, United States v. Stevens, and others). In many of these cases, he illustrated how the flawed theories that support the correct decisions act to undermine the proper defense of freedom. He also discussed what a proper defense would look like in each case and suggested ways that we can act to protect freedom of speech into the future by improving its foundations.

Dr. Eric Daniels is a research assistant professor at the Clemson Institute for the Study of Capitalism. He lectures internationally on American history. He recently coauthored U.S. Economic Freedom Index. He contributes to The Objective Standard and wrote a chapter for Abolition of Antitrust.

In addition, you can listen to the audio from the webcast preview. (Dr. Daniels’ portion is 17 minutes, just after a 5-minute introduction from me on pledging for or purchasing the full webcast.)

If you’d prefer to download that file, you can do that here.

As for future OList Webcasts… I’m working on lining up webcasters now. I’m not yet sure who the OList webcaster will be in February, but stay tuned!

 

I’m pleased to announce a second pledge-funded webcast, this time with Eric Daniels! (Yay! I’m so excited!) I hope to arrange for one of these pledge-funded webcasts each month, hosted by OList.com.

On January 10th at 7:00 pm MT, historian Eric Daniels will webcast on the foundations of free speech, answering your questions about it.

Here’s Dr. Daniels’ proposal for the webcast:

Freedom of speech and expression forms a vital foundation of a free society. The Founding Fathers established a firm but not unassailable foundation for protecting this freedom in the First Amendment. Over the course of the twentieth century, freedom of speech experienced a patchwork of protection and rejection by the courts. In recent major cases, the US Supreme Court and lower courts have appeared to bolster the protection for speech in areas such as campaign finance, obscenity, and compelled speech. Despite these victories, the foundation of these decisions has relied upon the flawed theories of free speech that have been part of American jurisprudence. Without a proper foundation for freedom of speech, these cases will remain a paper barrier to further assaults on our freedoms.

In this webcast, Dr. Daniels will investigate some interesting recent developments in First Amendment cases (including Citizens United v. FEC, United States v. Stevens, and others). In many of these cases, he will illustrate how the flawed theories that support the correct decisions act to undermine the proper defense of freedom. He will also discuss what a proper defense would look like in each case and suggest ways that we can act to protect freedom of speech into the future by improving its foundations.

For those of you not yet familiar with Eric Daniels as a lecturer, I pity you, because he’s legendary! His courses at OCON are always stellar. I was particularly enthused by his course on Freedom of Speech in American History given in 2008. That, plus my own frustrating encounters with campaign finance laws, are why I invited him to webcast on the topic of free speech.

The structure for this webcast will be slightly different from Adam Mossoff’s November webcast on intellectual property.

First, Eric Daniels will give a 10 minute free “teaser” for the webcast on Monday, January 3rd at 7:00 pm MT. That’s exactly one week before the webcast, and five days from today. You’ll be able to access that on the public web page for this webcast. (Yes, I will post reminders of that.)

Second, every pledger will be welcome to attend the live webcast and participate in the text chat. Every pledger will be able to submit and vote on questions via Google Moderate too. People who pledge more money will be more likely to have their questions addressed, however.

Third, an audio file of the webcast will be available for download. You cannot share that with anyone outside your own household, but you’ll be able to play it from now until doomsday, if you like. You’ll also have access to streaming video of the webcast for about two months.

As before, you’re welcome to pledge any amount. However, please remember that whether the webcast happens or not depends on the total amount of money pledged. The webcast will be green-lit or cancelled, depending on the pledges received by noon on January 6th. (That’s just eight days away!) Also, if the webcast takes place, I’ll post it for sale after the fact for $50.

So… if you want this webcast to take place, if you want to support Dr. Daniels’ work, and if you want to support this new webcast series, please pledge!

Do you want to pledge? I hope so! Please remember that your pledge is a contract to pay for the webcast, if delivered, and you should consider yourself honor-bound to pay that pledge.

If you have any problems with that embedded form, try this form.

The critical dates for this webcast can be found on the OList Calendar. To sum up:

  • Monday, January 3rd, 7 pm MT: Free Teaser Webcast
  • Thursday, January 6th, 12 pm MT: Pledge Deadline
  • Monday, January 10th, 7 pm MT: Private Webcast for Pledgers

OList Webcast Pledge FAQ

How much should I pledge?

That’s entirely up to you. You should pledge whatever the webcast is worth to you, knowing that if enough people don’t pledge enough money, the webcast will be cancelled. In that case, all pledges will be void. Also, you should pledge more if you have questions that you’d really like answered.

Will anyone know what I’ve pledged?

No one except the webcast organizers and webcaster will know how much you’ve pledged. Nothing about your pledge will be made public.

What if I don’t pay what I’ve pledged?

If you’re not satisfied with the quality of the webcast, I will grant a refund, provided that you explain your reasons. However, if you simply welch on your pledge, you’re a schmuck. In that case, you will not be welcome to pledge on any future projects until you pay me the money you owe me, including a hefty penalty for being a schmuck.

What if I want to alter my pledge?

If you wish to increase your pledge, you can always pledge more by e-mailing me your new pledge amount. If you make a mistake in your pledge, you can e-mail me before the pledge deadline to adjust it.

How will I submit questions for the webcast?

You’ll submit questions for the webcast via Google Moderator. I’ll send you the link to that forum shortly after I receive your pledge.

How will I get access to the live webcast?

A few days before the webcast, I’ll e-mail you the url, login, and password for the live webcast. After the webcast, you’ll be able to use the same url, login, and password to view the streaming recorded video or download the audio file.

Can I share the webcast with anyone else?

You may only share it with other members of your household. If you’d like to give the webcast to someone else as a gift, you can do that by submitting an additional pledge. If you distribute the private link or audio file, you will not be welcome to pledge on any future projects until you compensate me for the theft of that property, even if accidental.

How do I pay you?

After the webcast, you’ll receive payment instructions in the invoice I’ll send you. My preferred method of payment is PayPal, but you’re welcome to sent me a check or money order, if that’s what you prefer.

What if I’m not satisfied with the webcast?

If you’re not satisfied with the quality of the webcast, I will grant a refund (or void your pledge), provided that you e-mail me to explain your reasons.

If I don’t pledge, will I be able to purchase the webcast later?

The webcast will be available for sale for $50.

What do I do if I have some other question?

Please e-mail me at diana@dianahsieh.com.

 

Last month, Adam Mossoff gave a fantastic webcast on intellectual property. The content and style of the presentation was stellar, and I enjoyed the excitement of the live event even more than I expected. In fact, the presentation challenged a number of my conventional assumptions about intellectual property, e.g. about the DMCA. As a result, I’ll definitely approach these issues with more knowledge and care in the future due to the webcast.

So… I’m pleased to announce that the webcast — in the form of 1 hour and 34 minutes of streaming video — is now available for sale. It costs $50 to purchase. For that price, you’ll enjoy full access to the streaming video for at least two months. You’re welcome to share that streaming video with members of your own household, but not with anyone one else. You cannot download the video, nor any audio.

Here are two clips from the webcast itself. The first is part of the explanation of why all property is fundamentally intellectual property. The second concerns software patents, including time limits on patents.

And here’s the updated abstract:

Ayn Rand was the first philosopher to recognize that all property is at root intellectual property (IP), because all property comprises material values that are born of the human mind. In this webcast, Professor Mossoff explains this uniquely Objectivist defense of IP rights and answers questions submitted by the participants. First, he provides a brief overview of IP, explaining what it is and why it is properly defined as a property right that should be secured under the law. He then responds to questions from participants, covering such issues as the nature and justification for time limits on patents and copyrights, whether computer software should be patented, and the alleged problem of “patent trolls,” among other issues. Professor Mossoff’s discussion presents a sweeping analysis of IP rights, touching upon contemporary legal disputes and historical developments–all of which supports Rand’s view that all property rights, whether in land, factories, consumer goods, securities, or inventions and books, are made possible by innovators who first conceived of these new values.

To purchase the webcast, you simply need to send me $50, preferably via PayPal. If you do that, I’ll send you the instructions for viewing the webcast within 24 hours.

Or, if you would prefer to pay by check or money order, please submit this order form, then mail your payment of $50 for each webcast ordered to Diana Hsieh; P.O. Box 851; Sedalia, CO 80135. In that case, you can expect an e-mail with instructions for viewing the webcast in a week or two, once payment has been received.

To give the webcast as a gift to someone outside your own household, you need only purchase a copy for that purpose, then send that person the instructions for viewing it. Please do not view the webcast unless you have purchased a copy for yourself. (It’s an honor system.)

For in-person group events such as Objectivist club meetings, one person in the group must purchase the webcast for $50, then every person not of that household must pay $10 to attend the viewing. The extra people are not entitled to access the webcast after that group viewing. The $50 payment must be made in advance of the viewing, but the $10 for each additional viewer can be paid after the event. To pay for those additional viewers, please use this PayPal link or the order form.

Starting in January, I will be producing similar pledge-funded webcasts every month with various Objectivist intellectuals. While the details aren’t yet set in stone, they’re likely to happen in the middle of the month, on Mondays. In January, historian Eric Daniels will speak on the foundations of free speech. (Yay!) For that webcast, everyone who pledges will be welcome to ask questions beforehand and attend the live event. They’ll also have access to the streaming video for about two months. As usual, I’ll be announcing the details of that January webcast on NoodleFood and the OLists, likely after Christmas.

 

The pledging for Adam Mossoff’s webcast on intellectual property closes in 48 hours — on Sunday, November 14th at 2 pm ET.

Once again, here’s the basic information:

The webcast will be held — and recorded — on Monday, November 15th at 8 pm ET. It will be between 60 and 90 minutes. Those not attending live will be able to view it on Tuesday.

Everyone who pledges, whatever the amount, will be able to watch a video recording of the webcast. Otherwise, any pledge amount is welcome! However, if you pledge more than $40, you can attend the live event and participate in the chat. Our space for the live event is limited. But if you don’t attend live, you’ll be able to watch the video recording of the event starting on Tuesday. (You’re also welcome to watch it again and again, even if you do attend live.)

Just remember, you must pledge by this Sunday, November 14th at 2 pm ET. You can do so with this form.

If you have any problems with that embedded form, try this one. If you have any questions or suggestions, please feel free to post them in the comments.

Here’s Professor Mossoff’s proposal for this webcast:

Ayn Rand was the first to recognize that all property is at root intellectual property. The law and history support Rand’s view that all property rights, whether in land, factories, consumer goods, securities, or inventions and books, are made possible by innovators who first conceived of these new values. Professor Mossoff will give a brief overview of the evidence supporting Rand’s view and answer questions about the theory, history, and law of intellectual property.

You can find more on Professor Mossoff on his GMU faculty web page, and you can download many of his papers from his SSRN page.

 

You have one last chance to pledge for Adam Mossoff’s webcast on intellectual property! The project has been green-lit, thanks to to pledges already made. (YAY!) So the webcast will be on the evening of Monday, November 15th.

Here’s the basic information, with a few updates:

The webcast will be held — and recorded — on Monday, November 15th, likely around 8 pm ET. It will be between 60 and 90 minutes. Those not attending live will be able to view it on Tuesday.

You must pledge by this Sunday, November 14th at 2 pm ET. Everyone who pledges, whatever the amount, will be able to watch a video recording of the webcast. However, those who pledge a bit more get to be more involved.

If you pledge more than $20, you can submit questions (and vote other others’ questions) in advance. The question form on Google Moderate will be open until Thursday evening, so if you want to do that, please pledge soon!

If you please more than $40, you can attend the live event and participate in the chat. Our space for the live event is limited. But if you don’t attend live, you’ll be able to watch the video recording of the event starting on Tuesday. (You’re also welcome to watch it again and again, even if you do attend live.)

Of course, any pledge amount is welcome! Just remember, you must pledge by this Sunday, November 14th at 2 pm ET.

If you’d like to pledge, you can do so with this form. Even if you’re pledging less than $20, please include your questions in the comment field.

If you have any problems with that embedded form, try this one. If you have any questions or suggestions, please feel free to post them in the comments.

Here’s Professor Mossoff’s proposal for this webcast:

Ayn Rand was the first to recognize that all property is at root intellectual property. The law and history support Rand’s view that all property rights, whether in land, factories, consumer goods, securities, or inventions and books, are made possible by innovators who first conceived of these new values. Professor Mossoff will give a brief overview of the evidence supporting Rand’s view and answer questions about the theory, history, and law of intellectual property.

As that description suggests, the webcast will focus on answering pledgers’ questions about intellectual property.

You can find more on Professor Mossoff on his GMU faculty web page, and you can download many of his papers from his SSRN page.

Also, please note that Professor Mossoff cannot provide legal advice, and thus webcast questions should not concern, directly or indirectly, any legal disputes involving the questioner, either directly or indirectly.

Oct 292010
 

Adam Mossoff’s work on patents was recently discussed in a Wall Street Journal blog post entitled What Smartphone Makers Can Learn From the Sewing Machine Patent War by David Zax. It begins:

The smartphone market is highly lucrative, has many competing players, and involves countless patents. In other words, it’s a recipe for lawsuits. In the last month alone, Microsoft lobbed a suit at Motorola, who in turn sued Apple. Nokia and HTC both have sued Apple, and Apple has sued both Nokia and HTC.

The web of competing claims on smartphone technology might seem a uniquely 21st-century problem. But according to legal scholar Adam Mossoff, the smartphone woes are reminiscent of a forgotten 19th century legal melee: the Sewing Machine War.

It’s a quick look into some fascinating history that’s very relevant to policy debates about patents today. So go read it!

If you’re interested in these thorny and crucial questions about intellectual property, I strongly recommend that you join Adam Mossoff’s upcoming webcast. You have until November 6th to pledge, and the details can be found in this post. This evening, I’ll set up Google Moderate for the people who pledged enough to participate in the asking of and voting on questions. (Those pledgers will get an e-mail from me with the URL.)

If you’d like to pledge, here’s the form:

I’m really excited about this lecture, and I do hope that you’ll join us!

 

I’m delighted to announce a new project that I’m helping to organize: the hosting of live online events (i.e. webcasts) with notable intellectuals and producers about their work. Even better, our first webcast will be law professor Adam Mossoff speaking on questions about intellectual property!

Even amongst its staunch defenders, the basis and limits of intellectual property are always hot topics. That was plain as day based on the long lines of people hoping to ask Professor Mossoff questions about the theoretical basis and practical implementation of intellectual property after his lecture at OCON this summer.

Here’s Professor Mossoff’s proposal for this webcast:

Ayn Rand was the first to recognize that all property is at root intellectual property. The law and history support Rand’s view that all property rights, whether in land, factories, consumer goods, securities, or inventions and books, are made possible by innovators who first conceived of these new values. Professor Mossoff will give a brief overview of the evidence supporting Rand’s view and answer questions about the theory, history, and law of intellectual property.

As that description suggests, the webcast will focus on answering your questions about intellectual property. It will last between 60 and 90 minutes.

In case you’re not familiar with Adam Mossoff — or his ground-breaking work on intellectual property — here’s a bit more about him:

Adam Mossoff is Professor of Law at George Mason University School of Law, where he teaches and writes in the areas of property and intellectual property law. His research focuses on the intersection between intellectual property law and property theory, and has published numerous articles on topics in patent law, property law, legal history and legal philosophy. He graduated with honors from the University of Chicago Law School.

You can find more on Professor Mossoff on his GMU faculty web page, and you can download many of his papers from his SSRN page. But mostly, I should say that Adam Mossoff’s lecture on intellectual property at OCON was fantastic, and he was particularly stellar in the Q&A. That’s why we’re so excited to have him as our first speaker.

If you want this lecture to take place, if you want to support Professor Mossoff’s extraordinary work, and if you want to help create a new outlet for the dissemination of intellectual ideas, please pledge. You can pledge whatever dollar amount this lecture is worth to you.

If enough people have pledged enough money by noon on November 6th to make this project worth producing, then I’ll email everyone who has committed, you’ll send the payment, and I’ll send you a private link to the lecture. The lecture will be recorded on the evening of Monday, November 15th. You’ll receive a link to the recorded version soon after that date.

That’s awesome, right? Right! But wait, there’s more! If you pledge $20 or more you can submit questions in advance of the event, see all questions submitted by others, and vote on the questions you most want to hear answers to in the lecture. (We’ll use Google Moderate for that.) Professor Mossoff will craft the bulk of his lecture around the questions and topics that people are interested in, provided that they’re consistent with his topic and theme.

In addition, a select number of people will be invited to participate in the live online event so you can watch it while it’s taking place, participate in the live chat, and ask questions of Professor Mossoff during the webcast. How do you participate live?

1) If you have made one of the top 10 highest pledges by the November 6th deadline you will be invited to the live online event.

2) Everyone is encouraged to invite their friends to pledge for this event. The top 10 people who have brought the most number of friends to join in the pledging will receive a personal invitation to the live event. (Hence, share this post on Facebook!)

(We might offer more options for the live event later.)

Do you want to pledge? I hope so! (If you were referred by a friend, please note his/her name in the comment field of your pledge. Also, even if you’re pledging less than $20, please include your questions in that field.)

If you have any problems with that embedded form, try this one. If you have any questions or suggestions, please feel free to post them in the comments.

Also, please note that Professor Mossoff cannot provide legal advice, and thus webcast questions should not concern, directly or indirectly, any legal disputes involving the questioner, either directly or indirectly.

Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha