Jun 252012
 

On Sunday’s episode of Philosophy in Action Radio, Greg Perkins and I answered questions on corporal punishment of kids, parenting as a central purpose, compartmentalized cheating, something greater than yourself, and more. The podcast of that episode is now available for streaming or downloading.

You can automatically download podcasts of Philosophy in Action Radio by subscribing to Philosophy in Action’s Podcast RSS Feed:


Whole Podcast: 24 June 2012

Listen or Download:

Remember the Tip Jar!

The mission of Philosophy in Action is to spread rational principles for real life… far and wide. That’s why the vast majority of my work is available to anyone, free of charge. I love doing the radio show, but each episode requires an investment of time, effort, and money to produce. So if you enjoy and value that work of mine, please contribute to the tip jar. I suggest $5 per episode or $20 per month, but any amount is appreciated. In return, contributors can request that I answer questions from the queue pronto, and regular contributors enjoy free access to premium content and other goodies.


Podcast Segments: 24 June 2012

You can download or listen to my answers to individual questions from this episode below.

Introduction

My News of the Week: I’m on vacation, and alas, that affects the audio quality for the worse.

Question 1: Corporal Punishment of Kids

Question: Is corporal punishment of children ever proper? The 2011 video of Judge William Adams beating his daughter raises the question of whether it’s ever necessary or proper to physically discipline children. Does the age of the child matter, particularly given that you can’t reason with younger children? Does the amount of force used matter? When does physical punishment violate the child’s rights?

My Answer, In Brief: To force obedience on your weak and dependent children by violence is immoral and impractical.

Listen or Download:

Links:

To comment on this question or my answer, visit its comment thread.

Question 2: Parenting as a Central Purpose

Question: Can parenting be a central purpose in life? Many people think that only a career can serve as a person’s central purpose. They think that a central purpose must be remunerative, and that it can’t be merely temporary. Is that right? Can parenting be a person’s central purpose, even if only for a few years?

My Answer, In Brief: The notion of “central purpose” seems to be misused by many Objectivists: it refers to a person’s productive work, not a specific theme thereof. Parenting is a productive activity, and it can be a person’s primary productive activity.

Listen or Download:

Links:

To comment on this question or my answer, visit its comment thread.

Question 3: Compartmentalized Cheating

Question: Is it true that, “if you cheat on your wife, you’ll cheat on your business partner”? A few months ago, a Republican presidential candidate said of Newt Gingrich, “if you cheat on your wife, you’ll cheat on your business partner.” Leaving aside the specifics of any particular politician’s personal life, is the broader principle accurate? If you knew that someone cheated on his wife, does that mean he should be regarded as an untrustworthy for a business partnership? Or as morally unfit to be your doctor? Or as unfit to be an elected official?

My Answer, In Brief: Depending on the person’s motive for the affair, the cheating might be compartmentalized or infect other areas of his life.

Listen or Download:

To comment on this question or my answer, visit its comment thread.

Question 4: Something Greater than Yourself

Question: Doesn’t everyone need to be a part of something greater than themselves? Most people want to be involved with some cause greater than themselves – whether God, their community, the state, the environment. Doesn’t everyone need that to help steer them in life? Or do you think that’s unnecessary or even wrong?

My Answer, In Brief: A person doesn’t need a cause greater than himself: he needs to value his own life, find inspiration in the great deeds of others, and accomplish great things himself.

Listen or Download:

Links:

To comment on this question or my answer, visit its comment thread.

Rapid Fire Questions

Questions:

  • Should the exclusionary rule be abolished?
  • Are companies morally responsible for the working conditions of their suppliers?
  • Is a sex offender registry just and proper?

Listen or Download:

  • Start Time: 54:17
  • Duration: 11:16
  • Download: MP3 Segment

To comment on these questions or my answers, visit its comment thread.

Conclusion

Be sure to check out the topics scheduled for upcoming episodes! Don’t forget to submit and vote on questions for future episodes too!

  • Start Time: 1:05:34


About Philosophy in Action Radio

Philosophy in Action Radio focuses on the application of rational principles to the challenges of real life. It broadcasts live on most Sunday mornings and many Thursday evenings over the internet. For information on upcoming shows, visit the Episodes on Tap. For podcasts of past shows, visit the Show Archives.

Philosophy in Action's NewsletterPhilosophy in Action's Facebook PagePhilosophy in Action's Twitter StreamPhilosophy in Action's RSS FeedsPhilosophy in Action's Calendar


   
Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha