In Sunday morning’s episode of Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio, I’ll answer questions on adopting ideas by default, griping versus moral judgment, veganism as child abuse, sharing lecture notes, and more with Greg Perkins.

  • Who: Dr. Diana Hsieh and Greg Perkins
  • What: Philosophy in Action Q&A Radio: Default Ideas, Unjust Complaints, Veganism, and More
  • When: Sunday, 18 November 2012, 8 am PT / 9 am MT / 10 am CT / 11 am ET
  • Where: Philosophy in Action’s Live Studio

This week’s questions are:

  • Question 1: Adopting Ideas by Default: Should a person allow his ideology to set his default positions? When people adopt a religion, philosophy, or politics as their own, they often don’t think through every issue – or they’ve not done so yet. Does accepting the various positions of that ideology as a kind of default amount to accepting them on faith? What should a person do when he hasn’t thought through the issue for himself?
  • Question 2: Griping Versus Moral Judgment: What’s the difference between griping about people and morally judging them? I take the virtue of justice seriously: I try to be careful and objective in my moral judgments of others, and then I act on those judgments. However, I’ve found that most people don’t do that. Instead, they bitch about other people out of annoyance, including about serious wrongs, but then continue to deal with those people as before, perhaps after a cooling-off period. I hate to listen to these unserious and often unjust complaints about others, and I don’t relish the thought of people complaining about me in that way to others. How can I explain my objections to such bitching in a friendly way? How can I avoid being bitched-to or bitched-about?
  • Question 3: Veganism as Child Abuse: Should it be considered child abuse to feed a child a vegan diet? Most experts agree that children need some of the nutrients found in meat and dairy products to develop properly. I’ve read lots of stories about children whose development is impaired or stunted due to being fed a vegan diet. Should it be considered child abuse to feed a child a strict vegan diet? If so, at which point should the state intervene and take legal recourse against the parents?
  • Question 4: Sharing Lecture Notes: Is it wrong to refuse to share lecture notes with a lazy student? A classmate of mine is nice enough but a bit odd. She’s always at least 30 minutes late for lecture, and she doesn’t come to lab sometimes. In lecture, she does not take notes but instead usually draws the whole class period. Today, she asked to borrow some of my lecture notes. I told her that I noticed that she was always late and that she didn’t take notes, and she denied that. Still, I told her that lending her my notes would be inconvenient, then I suggested that she ask someone else. Normally, I’d be happy to share my notes, but in this case, I didn’t want to share the results of my efforts in attending this class on time, every day, and paying attention. Was that wrong?

After that, we’ll tackle some impromptu “Rapid Fire Questions.”

To join the live broadcast and its chat, just point your browser to Philosophy in Action’s Live Studio a few minutes before the show is scheduled to start. If you attend the live show, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask me follow-up questions in the text chat.

If you miss the live broadcast, you’ll find the audio from the episode posted here: Q&A Radio: 18 November 2012.

Philosophy in Action Radio broadcasts every Sunday morning and Wednesday evening. For information on upcoming shows and more, visit the Episodes on Tap.

I hope that you join us on Sunday morning!

   
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