SnowCon Lectures!

 Posted by on 20 February 2013 at 8:00 am  Announcements, SnowCon
Feb 202013
 

Hooray! I’ve finally announced the lectures for SnowCon 2013. These lectures will be held on Saturday, March 16th in Sedalia from about 10 am to 5 pm.

One quick note, before I tell you about the lectures. If you plan to attend SnowCon 2013, please register as soon as you can. I need to have a rough idea of the head count for the Denver portion in order to make plans for Friday and Saturday dinners. You can register here.

Remember, you can join us for the whole enchilada, just the Denver portion, just the Saturday lectures, or any individual days or events.

Now, without further ado, here are the lectures:

Ari Armstrong on “Who Needs ‘Assault Weapons’ or ‘High-Capacity’ Magazines?”

What is an “assault weapon?” Do people “need” to own such a gun? Is there a basis for government regulation to restrict or ban (for non-police civilians) their manufacture, sale, or possession? This talk covers the basic history of “assault weapons” and “high-capacity” magazines–along with the moral and political considerations surrounding them.

Ari Armstrong is an assistant editor for The Objective Standard, where he blogs regularly. He is also the author of Values of Harry Potter: Lessons for Muggles.

Dr. Diana Hsieh on “Why You Don’t Want to Be Lucky”

Many people view their lives as driven by luck, such that they seek to maximize their good luck and minimize their bad luck. This view of luck, however, is based on a faulty understanding of the nature of luck and its role in human life. This lecture will unpack some common wrong views of luck, then present a rational alternative. We will see that people often shortchange themselves by accepting false views of luck — and that we can enjoy more success in their endeavors by adopting a more rational, purposeful approach.

Diana Hsieh received her Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2009. She now focuses on the application of rational principles to the challenges of real life. Her radio show, Philosophy in Action Radio, broadcasts live over the internet on Sunday mornings and Thursday evenings. Her work can be found at PhilosophyInAction.com.

Howard Roerig on “Frac’ing: What It Is and Why We Should All Embrace It”

Hydraulic fracturing (frac’ing) is a widely discussed and frequently misunderstood term in the news today. In this lecture you will learn what frac’ing is, how it is done, the many benefits it offers, and the facts and science to dispel the many popular myths about its use in the oil industry. This is a technology that is critical to our everyday life, and one that everyone should better understand.

Howard Roerig is a small business owner in the Denver metro area, and lives in the mountains west of Sedalia. He has been involved in Objectivism for fifty years, and is one of the founding members of Front Range Objectivism. With the rise of the environmentalist movement and the many controversies over energy, he has developed a strong personal interest in the role energy plays in our lives.

Dr. Paul Hsieh on “Concierge Medicine: The Last Bastion of Health Care Freedom”

As the ObamaCare health law is phased in, patients will be increasingly subjected to government controls dictating what care they can receive and when. Fortunately, many doctors are responding by moving into various type of “concierge medicine” and “direct pay” practices where they can still treat patients according to their own best judgment relatively free from such government constraints. This talk will discuss the rapidly growing field of concierge medicine, the various concierge models, why many patients can benefit from it, how to evaluate a concierge practice, and how and why patients can help defend the morality of concierge medicine.

Paul Hsieh, MD, is a physician and advocate of free-market health care reforms. He is co-founder of FIRM (Freedom and Individual Rights in Medicine), and writes regularly on health care policy for Forbes and PJ Media.

   
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