The next Philosophy in Action Radio will be a podcast titled "Moral Conflicts and the Virtue of Justice." It will be posted to the archive on Tuesday morning, 19 August 2014. Don't miss it!


Free Will

  • Chat: Responsibility & Luck, Chapter Two: 5 Jun 2014
  • Summary: What are some of the common proposed solutions to the problem of moral luck? How and why do they fail? I will answer these questions and more in this live discussion of Chapter Two of my book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame.

    Tags: Academia, Compatibilism, Crime, Determinism, Egalitarianism, Ethics, Free Will, John Rawls, Justice, Law, Luck, Moral Judgment, Moral Luck, Philosophy, Politics, Responsibility

  • Q&A: Free Will and Moral Responsibility: 17 Nov 2013, Question 1
  • Question: What is the relationship between free will and moral responsibility? To me, the concept of free will found in debates about determinism seems different from the concept of free will relevant to questions of moral responsibility. The former is a metaphysical concept, and a person either has free will or not. The latter is a psychological concept, and it seems to be a matter of degree based on nature and nurture. However, psychological free will seems to presuppose metaphysical free will. Is that right? What is the relationship between free will and moral responsibility?

    Tags: Ethics, Free Will, Moral Judgment, Moral Luck, Responsibility

  • Q&A: Psychological Egoism: 6 Oct 2013, Question 2
  • Question: Isn't every action selfish, ultimately? Unless coerced, people act however they deem best at that moment. Even if that action is harmful to themselves, aren't they acting selfishly, so as to satisfy their own desires? Even paragons of altruism act because they want to help people, please God, or save the environment: that's what makes them happy. So isn't true, deep-down altruism impossible?

    Tags: Determinism, Egoism, Ethics, Free Will, Psychological Egoism, Self-Interest

  • Q&A: Innate Personality: 26 May 2013, Question 2
  • Question: Can personality be innate? In past shows, you've indicated that you think that some aspects of personality are innate, rather than acquired by experience. What does that mean? What is the evidence for that view? Moreover, wouldn't that be a form of determinism? Wouldn't that violate the principle that every person is born a "blank slate"?

    Tags: Determinism, Free Will, Personality, Psychology, Tabula Rasa

  • Q&A: Free Will and Natural Law: 13 Jan 2013, Question 1
  • Question: Is free will merely an illusion? While I dislike the idea that we're just puppets of physics and natural law, I wonder whether our seemingly "free" decisions are actually determined by the combination of our biology and our environment. After all, if our brain is merely a physical and chemical system, how could any any decisions be made freely? Wouldn't that violate natural law? In essence, how can our knowledge that the physical universe is deterministic be reconciled with our subjective feeling that we choose our actions?

    Tags: Causality, Free Will, Introspection, Materialism, Metaphysics, Science

  • Q&A: The Evidence for Free Will: 16 Oct 2011, Question 3
  • Question: Is there objective evidence for free will? After doing some research on free will and determinism, the existence of free will seems pretty unlikely to me – even though the thought of free will is comforting. An argument often used to refute determinism is that the determinist says that we should accept determinism, since on his view, he only advocates determinism because he's determined. That seems unsatisfying, however, since that doesn't prove the existence of free will. Also, even if each person can say of himself, "I have free will," how do you determine whether others have free will? How would you know whether a toddler, a teenager, a person with a brain tumor, or a person with dementia has free will or not?

    Tags: Free Will, Metaphysics, Philosophy, Science

  • Q&A: Genetic Influences on Thinking: 2 Oct 2011, Question 3
  • Question: Do our genes affect our reasoning? Evolution makes fruit taste sweet and burning human flesh smell awful. Presumably, evolution can hard wire pleasures and pains because interaction with that thing has caused our ancestors to live longer or die earlier. Wouldn't this same process make certain actions easier or more difficult, such as sacrificing yourself to save your child versus watching your child die? Couldn't evolution affect that decision by making focus more difficult, so that a person is easier impelled by his immediate emotions?

    Tags: Evolution, Free Will, Psychology, Rationality, Science, Values

  • Q&A: Desires and Determinism: 17 Apr 2011, Question 6
  • Question: How do you validate free will? For example, if a man is hungry and he values his life, then wouldn't his eating be predetermined?

    Tags: Emotions, Free Will, Introspection, Metaphysics, Philosophy

  • Q&A: Evolutionary Psychology: 20 Feb 2011, Question 2
  • Question: What is your opinion of evolutionary psychology? For example, a recent study claims that there is a gene for being a political liberal. Or another claim is that studies show that women are "hypergamous" in that they are "wired" to seek out the most "socially dominant" men that they can find in the "sexual market". What is your opinion on all this?

    Tags: Evolution, Free Will, Psychology, Science, Sex

  • Q&A: Causality and Free Will: 30 Jan 2011, Question 5
  • Question: How are causality and free will compatible? If my mind is an effect of my brain, and my brain is a complex physical system which operates in a deterministic way, doesn't that mean that my thoughts and actions are ultimately determined, too? What is wrong with the popular notions of causality and free will that make them appear incompatible?

    Tags: Causality, Free Will, Materialism, Metaphysics, Science

  • Podcast: Cultivating Concentration: 14 Oct 2009
  • Summary: The power to concentrate is not a natural talent: it's a skill that people need to cultivate. Here, I discuss methods for cultivating your power to concentrate.

    Tags: Concentration, Focus, Free Will, Habits, Psycho-Epistemology


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