On the next Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on the special seven virtues, signs of repression, the ethics of care for the body, and more. The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 12 April 2015. If you can't attend live, be sure to listen to the podcast later.


Mind-Body-Integration

  • Q&A: The Ethics of Care for the Body: 12 Apr 2015, Question 3
  • Question: What is the moral status of actions aimed at tending to one's body? In an egoistic ethics, the ultimate end of moral action is the growth and continuation of one's own life. Ayn Rand elaborated on discussed many of the kinds of actions required to achieve this goal, but she didn't discuss matters of "bodily care," such as cleaning your teeth, eating well, exercising regularly, tending to a wound, and seeking necessary medical care. These constitute a whole universe of actions necessary for the maintenance of one's body and, hence, one's life. Are such actions moral and virtuous? Should bodily care itself be considered a virtue? Or are these actions already subsumed under the virtues? (If so, I would love to know how to brush my teeth with integrity and pride!)

    Tags: Body, Character, Health, Mind-Body-Integration, Values, Virtue


    Share This Page