On the next Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on the objectivity of manners, fighting words, obsessing over past conversations, and more. The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 30 November 2014. If you can't attend live, be sure to listen to the podcast later.


Taxes

  • Q&A: Taxes Versus Slavery: 12 May 2013, Question 1
  • Question: Are high taxes comparable to slavery? On Facebook, some friends suggest that America is becoming more like Nazi Germany. Others share images comparing Americans workers to slaves picking cotton in the antebellum south due to our ever-higher taxes. I think these comparisons go way too far: Americans are still some of the freest people the world has ever known. No doubt, our freedom is being chipped away, but are we really like slaves?

    Tags: Activism, Apocalypticism, Epistemology, Government, History, Language, Politics, Slavery, Taxes

  • Q&A: The Cost of Freedom: 8 Jul 2012, Question 4
  • Question: Shouldn't freedom be "free"? I often hear the bromide "freedom isn't free," or some variation of it, such as, "there's a price for freedom." But isn't freedom actually free? A person acts by right in pursuing his own life and happiness, and criminals do not have any right to coerce or threaten others. If freedom is the political expression of rights in a social or political context, it follows that there should be no "cost" to exercising one's rights. It isn't a sacrifice to not violate others rights, since respect for them is a selfish virtue, nor would it be a sacrifice to voluntarily fund a proper government that protects one's rights, since the benefit outweighs the cost. Am I correct in thinking freedom, properly understood and protected, is indeed free, or not? If I am, what do people mean when they say, "freedom isn't free," and what's the proper response?

    Tags: Free Society, Government, Military, Politics, Rights, Sacrifice, Taxes

  • Q&A: JK Rowling's Welfare Payments: 7 Aug 2011, Question 2
  • Question: Should JK Rowling repay the British government for welfare payments made to her? She famously wrote the first Harry Potter novel while "on the dole." She has been fabulously successful since then, but she likely could not have written that first book without state support. Should she now pay back all the government welfare paid to her during that period?

    Tags: Ethics, Government, Justice, Literature, Statism, Taxes, Welfare

  • Q&A: Compulsory Juries: 15 May 2011, Question 4
  • Question: Are compulsory juries moral? Is it necessary and/or proper to compel citizens to serve on a jury? If not, what is the best way to ensure the right to a trial by a jury of your peers, rather than trial by government agents? Should a free society have professional volunteer juries like the military?

    Tags: Free Society, Government, Juries, Law, Military, Objectivism, Politics, Rights, Taxes

  • Q&A: Cheating on Taxes: 20 Feb 2011, Question 4
  • Question: Is it immoral to cheat on your taxes? It's essentially a lie to protect the products of your labor. So is it wrong just because it's illegal?

    Tags: Ethics, Government, Honesty, Law, Rights, Taxes

  • Interview: Stephen Bailey on Politics Based on Principle: 23 Sep 2010
  • Summary: What does a principled political candidate say and do? Stephen Bailey – the Republican candidate for US House of Representatives for Colorado's Second District in 2010 – gives us a good example in this discussion of his principles and prospects.

    Tags: Abortion, Alcohol/Drugs, Campaign Finance, Economy, Elections, Environmentalism, Government, Immigration, Personhood, Politics, Religion, Rights, Taxes


    Share This Page