On the next Philosophy in Action Radio, I'll answer questions on the moral arguments for veganism and vegetarianism, courage as a struggle against fear, ungrateful people, and more. The live broadcast begins at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 23 November 2014. If you can't attend live, be sure to listen to the podcast later.

Upcoming Radio Shows

For a full listing of past and upcoming shows, visit the podcast archive, sorted by date or by topic.

Sunday, 23 November 2014: Q&A on Veganism and Vegetarianism, Courage, Ungrateful People, and More

On Sunday, 23 November 2014, Greg Perkins and I will answer questions on the moral arguments for veganism and vegetarianism, courage as a struggle against fear, ungrateful people, and more on Philosophy in Action Radio. This episode of internet radio airs at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET in our live studio. If you can't listen live, you'll find the podcast on the episode's archive page.

Episode Details

Sunday, 30 November 2014: Q&A on Objectivity of Manners, Fighting Words, Past Conversations, and More

On Sunday, 30 November 2014, Greg Perkins and I will answer questions on the objectivity of manners, fighting words, obsessing over past conversations, and more on Philosophy in Action Radio. This episode of internet radio airs at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET in our live studio. If you can't listen live, you'll find the podcast on the episode's archive page.

Episode Details


Recently Posted Podcasts

For a full listing of past and upcoming shows, visit the podcast archive, sorted by date or by topic.

Thursday, 20 November 2014: Podcast on "Ayn Rand's Philosophy: Myth Versus Reality"

On Thursday, 20 November 2014, I posted a podcast titled "Ayn Rand's Philosophy: Myth Versus Reality" to Philosophy in Action Radio. If you missed the live broadcast, you can now listen to the podcast.

What are some common confusions about Ayn Rand's philosophy of Objectivism? In this talk, I briefly survey Ayn Rand's basic principles, then explore six common but false views about her, namely: (1) Ayn Rand was primarily concerned with politics. (2) Ayn Rand was an elitist: she despised everyone except super-high achievers. (3) Ayn Rand's ethics tells people to do whatever the heck they feel like doing. (4) Ayn Rand supported charity: she just thought it should be voluntary. (5) Ayn Rand's advocacy of reason and logic excludes any concern for emotions. (6) Ayn Rand's ideas are compatible with belief in God and Christianity. This talk was given to the Free Minds Film Festival on 8 October 2011.

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Wednesday, 19 November 2014: Podcast on "The Cultivation of Character"

On Wednesday, 19 November 2014, I posted a podcast titled "The Cultivation of Character" to Philosophy in Action Radio. If you missed the live broadcast, you can now listen to the podcast.

In his Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle speaks of cultivating virtues by repeatedly doing certain actions in certain ways. However, he never clearly explains the relationship between a person's thoughts, emotions, actions, and character. So, we must ask: What is character? How is a person's character formed? And what is the role of character in a person's life? This lecture draws on my dissertation, now published as Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame, to answer these criticial practical questions of ethics. This lecture was originally given at SnowCon in March 2011, then re-recorded in April 2011.

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Sunday, 9 November 2014: Q&A on Anarchism's Case Against Government, Sportsmanship, Sleeping Around, and More

On Sunday, 9 November 2014, Greg Perkins and I answered questions on anarchism's case against government, the value of sportsmanship, sleeping around, and more on Philosophy in Action Radio. If you missed the live broadcast, you can now listen to the podcast.

Does the government monopoly on the use of force violate rights? What is the meaning and value of sportsmanship? Why would anyone even want to sleep around?

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Thursday, 30 October 2014: Q&A on Improving Politicians, Psychological Visibility, and More

On Thursday, 30 October 2014, Greg Perkins and I answered questions on improving candidates for office, increasing psychological visibility, and more on Philosophy in Action Radio. If you missed the live broadcast, you can now listen to the podcast.

How can people improve the quality of politicians in office? How can I achieve greater psychological visibility?

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About Philosophy in Action

I'm Dr. Diana Hsieh. I'm a philosopher specializing in the application of rational principles to the challenges of real life. I received my Ph.D in philosophy from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2009. My book, Responsibility & Luck: A Defense of Praise and Blame, is available for purchase in paperback, as well as for Kindle and Nook. The book defends the justice of moral praise and blame of persons using an Aristotelian theory of moral responsibility, thereby refuting Thomas Nagel's "problem of moral luck."

My radio show, Philosophy in Action Radio, broadcasts live over the internet on Sunday mornings and most Thursday evenings. On Sunday mornings, I answer questions applying rational principles to the challenges of real life in a live hour-long show. Greg Perkins of Objectivist Answers co-hosts the show. On Thursday evenings, I interview an expert guest or chat about a topic of interest.

If you join us for the live broadcasts, you can ask follow-up questions and make comments in the text-based chat. Otherwise, you can listen to the podcast by subscribing to our Podcast RSS Feed. You can also peruse the podcast archive, where episodes and questions are sorted by date and by topic.

For regular commentary, announcement, and humor, read my blog NoodleFood and subscribe to its Blog RSS Feed. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter and connect on social media too.

I can be reached via e-mail to diana@philosophyinaction.com.

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